Blurb for back cover of Reversible Skirt

by | Oct 16, 2010 | Memoir, Musings, Reversible Skirt | 16 comments

How’s this for the description to go on the back cover of Reversible Skirt?

When the mother of three little girls commits suicide, her husband wants more than anything to keep his family together, though his in-laws believe the children should be split up for proper care. He remarries in haste and tells his daughters his new wife is their mother. The youngest, Laura, believes her mother must have gone through a kind of magical transformation.

Reversible Skirt is written from Laura’s point of view as she sifts through remnants of her mother’s existence and struggles to fit into a community where her family’s strict rules are not the norm. When Laura’s father dies, her stepmother grows increasingly abusive, which propels Laura and her sisters into a lasting alliance. Thus their father’s wish that they stay together comes true, although not in the way he’d imagined.

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16 Comments

  1. Lysle

    Ok..you asked..I edited:

    When the mother of three little girls commits suicide, her husband wants more than anything to keep his family together. He remarries in haste and tells his daughters that his new wife is their mother. The youngest, Laura, believes her mother must have gone through a kind of magical transformation.

    Reversible Skirt, written from Laura’s point of view, sifts through the remnants of her mother’s existence and details her struggles to fit into a community where the family’s strict rules are not the norm. When Laura’s father dies, her stepmother grows increasingly abusive, propelling Laura and her sisters into a lasting alliance. Her father’s wish that they stay together comes true, although not in the way he’d imagined.

  2. Chris Predick

    This works for me! Now I need the book!!!

  3. Ruth

    Laura, I think your blurb for the back cover is PERRRRRFECT! Your description made me want to read your book to find out how your life played out and what your “aha” moment was like when you discovered your mother’s (i.e., stepmother’s) true identity. Your last sentence is a home run! Start the printing presses!

  4. admin

    Thank you, Ruth! That’s the kind of thing a descriptions are supposed to do, so, yea!, after all this time of not being able to write this dang thing, I think it’s just about there.

  5. admin

    Thank you, Chris! Not being able to get this written was one thing holding the process up, so I’ve made great strides today. There are still all sorts of things left to do, but I’ll get them done, I promise, as soon as I can.

  6. admin

    Thank you, Lysle, for your suggestions! I didn’t have the info about the in-laws in at first, and I see that you’ve suggested omitting it. So, I’m inclined to take it out. I don’t think I’ll change the blurb to say that Reversible Skirt sifts through anything because it was I who did the sifting, the book doesn’t do it. But your wanting to refine the sentence makes me think it may need some tweaking, probably tomorrow when it looks fresher to me. And when writing the last sentence, I took “Thus” in and out a few times. I’m inclined to take it out now, too. I think it’s quite something that the two things I was most unsure of are things you edited out. Thanks again for taking time to offer your edits.

  7. Debi Blood

    Perfect. It makes me eager and anxious to read the book, which is what the back cover is supposed to do, right?

  8. admin

    Thanks for your feedback, Debi. I appreciate how supportive you are both of me when we interact and of other writers who share their work with the world online. You’re building community one person at a time.

  9. Kate Farrell

    Wow, Laura, a wonderfully compressed copy. I like Lysle’s edits, too.

    What I would edit is one word, “husband,” and change that word to “widower” or “surviving husband.”
    I was slightly confused or had to think for a moment to consider if he would still BE a husband.
    These statements are powerful, stunning and poignant. You are so courageous to give voice to such trauma, dear Laura.

    Kate

  10. admin

    Thank you, Kate. Now I’m wondering, too, whether if your spouse dies, you are no longer a husband or wife. My Uncle John is a widower, but he very much still considers himself to be his dead wife’s husband. You’ve given me something to chew on here, for sure. I had “widower” in there at one point, but it seemed awkward to me, even though he was, in fact, a widower. I’m not comfortable with the pairing of “her” and “widower.” I’ve heard “a widower,” as in “he’s a widower,” but I’ve never heard of “her widower,” as in “he’s her widower.” I’m not sure “surviving” adds anything. I think his survival is implicit in the context, and it makes me chuckle a little as I wonder whether someone would think, well, did she have another husband who didn’t survive? There may be another adjective, though, like “grieving” or “devastated” (I had “devastated” in for a while and took it out) would help avoid confusion.

  11. Lynda Nutt McIntyre

    I’d stick with “husband” in this context. I think the meaning is quite clear. “Widow” and “widower” are usually used to describe someone’s marital status – as in divorced, widowed, single, married. You’re right about “her widower” sounding strange ~ for me that conjures up something like, “She’s going out with her widower tonight,” as though whoever “she” is actually owns one!

  12. admin

    “She’s going out with her widower tonight.” Ah, that gets me laughing. Could be the beginning of a good country song parody.

  13. Ruth

    For me, mentioning “in-laws” in your blurb provided intrigue and curiosity. Also, I vote for using “husband” rather than “widower”. Gosh, this is fun!

  14. admin

    It is fun, isn’t it. :o) I think I know what you mean about adding intrigue and curiosity, Ruth, but the addition slows the narrative down a bit too, so it is, I believe, a matter of deciding what’s most important. And that’s something I have a bit of time to contemplate because Kathy isn’t ready to begin working on layout yet, so I don’t have to rush this copy to her. In the meantime, I have to wrangle with a couple of Lighning Source (the printer I’m going to use) contracts. I have to get some more functionality to this website, too. Kathy loaned me a “WordPress for Dummies” book, but, argh! I’m not finding what I need in it—not yet anyway. Thanks for your additional input, my dear.

  15. Ann Philipp

    Laura, I love the third person voice. Works great.
    Another suggestion for husband could be ‘the father’.
    You could also change his daughters to ‘his girls’ or ‘the girls’.
    Good job!

  16. admin

    Thanks, Ann. Good suggestions! I’m going to let the blurb be for a few days and then edit it slightly. I appreciate your input.

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